Integrity Check Pragma

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Integrity Check Pragma

Drew, Stephen
Hi,
 
Sorry to ask a stupid question, but how exactly do I get the return
value from this pragma?
 
Thanks in advance,
Steve
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client/server

Martín Schamis
Hello, I´ve seen inthe sqllite page that,"If you have many client
programs accessing a common database over a network, you should consider
using a client/server database engine instead of SQLite"
 
1 .- This means that I can´t use a php on the web and the users acceding
to that page can`t modify the base ?
 
2.- Or there is a limi of users ?
 
3.- If there is a limit waht is it ?
 
Thanks,
 
Martín

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Re: client/server

Eugene Wee
Hi,

Mart?n Schamis wrote:
> 1 .- This means that I can?t use a php on the web and the users acceding
> to that page can`t modify the base ?
Not at all (if I correctly understand what you're trying to say).
For example, there exists a SQLite extension in PHP (which comes bundled by
default in PHP5, but currently does not support SQLite3).

 From what I see, the point that the documentation is trying to make is that
SQLite is not suitable when you're dealing with a congested network environment.
If you dont expect (many) users to be writing to the same database file
simultaneously, SQLite may still be a feasible option.

Eugene Wee

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RE: client/server

Martín Schamis
Hi, Eugene and everybody.

The problem I have is this, I´m implementing a web aplication that will
require up to 300 users writing at
The same time to the database file simultaneously. The question is, if
sqllite will supported ?

Thanks for your help.

Martín

-----Mensaje original-----
De: Eugene Wee [mailto:[hidden email]]
Enviado el: martes, 07 de junio de 2005 10:59
Para: [hidden email]
Asunto: Re: [sqlite] client/server


Hi,

Martín Schamis wrote:
> 1 .- This means that I can´t use a php on the web and the users
acceding
> to that page can`t modify the base ?
Not at all (if I correctly understand what you're trying to say).
For example, there exists a SQLite extension in PHP (which comes bundled
by
default in PHP5, but currently does not support SQLite3).

 From what I see, the point that the documentation is trying to make is
that
SQLite is not suitable when you're dealing with a congested network
environment.
If you dont expect (many) users to be writing to the same database file
simultaneously, SQLite may still be a feasible option.

Eugene Wee


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Re: client/server

David Morel
Martín Schamis a écrit :
> Hi, Eugene and everybody.
>
> The problem I have is this, I´m implementing a web aplication that will
> require up to 300 users writing at
> The same time to the database file simultaneously.

you mean 300 users connected simultaaneously, writing occasionaly to the
database I guess, which is not the same thing. Provided your queries are
optimized and you take care of copen connections (not leaving
connections open more than is strictly necessary) it could do the trick.
It all depends on how database-intensive your application is. But even
300 simultaneious connections won't make it on a very powerful mysql
server anyway.
--
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+-----------------------------------+
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Re: client/server

Clay Dowling
In reply to this post by Martín Schamis

Mart?n Schamis said:

> Hello, I?ve seen inthe sqllite page that,"If you have many client
> programs accessing a common database over a network, you should consider
> using a client/server database engine instead of SQLite"
>
> 1 .- This means that I can?t use a php on the web and the users acceding
> to that page can`t modify the base ?
>
> 2.- Or there is a limi of users ?
>
> 3.- If there is a limit waht is it ?

It means that the file shouldn't live on a network file system.  It your
web server folder is accessed via NFS or SMB (Windows File Share), SQLite
isn't the tool for you.

Given the volume of transaction processing you're indicating, you might
want to consider if this is the right database for you.  Consider if there
will really be 300 simultaneous connections (which is different from 300
simultaneous application users) that you might instead be in need of a
high availability client/server database model.  PostgreSQL fares very
well in this category, or some of the heftier commercial database
offerings.

Clay Dowling
--
Lazarus Notes from Lazarus Internet Development
http://www.lazarusid.com/notes/
Articles, Reviews and Commentary on web development

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Re: client/server

Andrew Piskorski
In reply to this post by Martín Schamis
On Tue, Jun 07, 2005 at 11:52:30AM -0300, Mart?n Schamis wrote:
> Hi, Eugene and everybody.
>
> The problem I have is this, I?m implementing a web aplication that will
> require up to 300 users writing at

Then why are you even looking at SQLite?  IMNSHO, unless you have some
compelling reasons otherwise, you should default to using PostgreSQL
for that sort of thing.  You haven't said much about what you're
really doing, but a large busy database-backed website with many
concurrent users is exactly the sort of OLTP niche where capable
client/server RDBMSs like PostgreSQL or Oracle shine.

--
Andrew Piskorski <[hidden email]>
http://www.piskorski.com/
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Re: client/server

Andrea Giammarchi
In reply to this post by Eugene Wee
Eugene Wee wrote:

> Not at all (if I correctly understand what you're trying to say).
> For example, there exists a SQLite extension in PHP (which comes
> bundled by default in PHP5, but currently does not support SQLite3).

pecl, PDO extensions allows PHP to use SQLITE Version 3.X too :-)
http://it2.php.net/manual/it/ref.pdo.php#pdo.drivers

andr3a

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Re: client/server

Ben Clewett
Just another suggestion to the problem which I use my self.

I use a single SQLite database for each client.  Hosting the database
collection on a bastion host as close to the client as I can get it.
Therefore no client/server connection used.

I then use a daemon which reads all the client SQLite databases in turn,
and writes them to a central DBMS, as well as writing information back
out to the client SQLite databases.  (My central database in my case is
MySQL because it's client/server and has a better locking model.)

I also use the Linux /dev/shm directory to store these bastion
databases.  Which reads/writes about 200 times faster than a uncached
disk.  Although this is erases when the server reboots.

This gives dramatic performance and low load on the central database :)

Ben


Andrea Giammarchi wrote:

> Eugene Wee wrote:
>
>> Not at all (if I correctly understand what you're trying to say).
>> For example, there exists a SQLite extension in PHP (which comes
>> bundled by default in PHP5, but currently does not support SQLite3).
>
>
> pecl, PDO extensions allows PHP to use SQLITE Version 3.X too :-)
> http://it2.php.net/manual/it/ref.pdo.php#pdo.drivers
>
> andr3a
>