Re: sqlite programmed in C++ ...

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Re: sqlite programmed in C++ ...

Rob Sciuk

John Stanton wrote:

> This is something of a digression but is pertinent.  Colleagues who
> worked with Bjarne Thorstrup (inventer of C++) tell me that Bjarne was
> disillusioned with C++ and its wide deployment and would encourage
> people not to use it unless there were clear advantages.
>
> In our own company we came to the same conclusion as Dr Hipp and used
> ANSI C for our compilers and database software.  C can be anything you
> want it to be.  For example you can ensure portability by incorporating
> your own  memory management system and tightly manage your use of
> foreign libraries. for quality assurance  You have access to highly
> optimizing compilers which can produce executables as good as those
> written by a skilled Assembler programmer.

Good points.

IIRC, Firebird, once a C based database system (Interbase by Borland), was
re-written in C++ by a team of people who simply "liked" C++.  The change
happened between version 1.x and 2.x I think.  The upshot is, there was a
fork in the project, but the 1.x code lives on.  It seemed to me a lot of
effort and I'm not sure what gains they are claiming, because I lost all
interest in Firebird when I realized that the project team were about to
pour a whole bunch of resources into re-writing it for its own sake, when
better returns could have been made on upgrading the existing code.

Personally, I like SQLite (and ANS C for that matter) just fine the way they
are.  Perhaps Sylvain would prefer to have a look at the Firebird 2.x project
for a C++ based DBMS should the implementation language be an issue.

Cheers,
Rob Sciuk
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Re: sqlite programmed in C++ ...

Sylvain Pointeau
Hi,
I also like C very much even if I prefer C++
Please note that I was asking to introduce C++ not to re-write (which would
be a total non-sense)

I just repeat that I use sqlite every days, and I find it awesome, I love
it.
C or C++? at the end : who cares?

I strongly believe that the persons are essential, more than the programming
language

Cheers,
Sylvain

On Wed, Jun 3, 2009 at 11:53 PM, Rob Sciuk <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> John Stanton wrote:
> > This is something of a digression but is pertinent.  Colleagues who
> > worked with Bjarne Thorstrup (inventer of C++) tell me that Bjarne was
> > disillusioned with C++ and its wide deployment and would encourage
> > people not to use it unless there were clear advantages.
> >
> > In our own company we came to the same conclusion as Dr Hipp and used
> > ANSI C for our compilers and database software.  C can be anything you
> > want it to be.  For example you can ensure portability by incorporating
> > your own  memory management system and tightly manage your use of
> > foreign libraries. for quality assurance  You have access to highly
> > optimizing compilers which can produce executables as good as those
> > written by a skilled Assembler programmer.
>
> Good points.
>
> IIRC, Firebird, once a C based database system (Interbase by Borland), was
> re-written in C++ by a team of people who simply "liked" C++.  The change
> happened between version 1.x and 2.x I think.  The upshot is, there was a
> fork in the project, but the 1.x code lives on.  It seemed to me a lot of
> effort and I'm not sure what gains they are claiming, because I lost all
> interest in Firebird when I realized that the project team were about to
> pour a whole bunch of resources into re-writing it for its own sake, when
> better returns could have been made on upgrading the existing code.
>
> Personally, I like SQLite (and ANS C for that matter) just fine the way
> they
> are.  Perhaps Sylvain would prefer to have a look at the Firebird 2.x
> project
> for a C++ based DBMS should the implementation language be an issue.
>
> Cheers,
> Rob Sciuk
> _______________________________________________
> sqlite-users mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://sqlite.org:8080/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/sqlite-users
>
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Re: sqlite programmed in C++ ...

John Stanton-3
To make technical decisions using emotion rather than logic is not a
good approach.  One should choose the best methodology for the
particular project, not be self indulgent and choose the one you like.

Recently we wrote an embedded application in C, permitting us to use the
available C compiler, but organized it very like a C++ program with
classes etc.  The benefit was that the code was more attuned to being
maintained and modified by programmers with a low skill level without
risking catastrophic side effects  from modifications.

Sylvain Pointeau wrote:

> Hi,
> I also like C very much even if I prefer C++
> Please note that I was asking to introduce C++ not to re-write (which would
> be a total non-sense)
>
> I just repeat that I use sqlite every days, and I find it awesome, I love
> it.
> C or C++? at the end : who cares?
>
> I strongly believe that the persons are essential, more than the programming
> language
>
> Cheers,
> Sylvain
>
> On Wed, Jun 3, 2009 at 11:53 PM, Rob Sciuk <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>  
>> John Stanton wrote:
>>    
>>> This is something of a digression but is pertinent.  Colleagues who
>>> worked with Bjarne Thorstrup (inventer of C++) tell me that Bjarne was
>>> disillusioned with C++ and its wide deployment and would encourage
>>> people not to use it unless there were clear advantages.
>>>
>>> In our own company we came to the same conclusion as Dr Hipp and used
>>> ANSI C for our compilers and database software.  C can be anything you
>>> want it to be.  For example you can ensure portability by incorporating
>>> your own  memory management system and tightly manage your use of
>>> foreign libraries. for quality assurance  You have access to highly
>>> optimizing compilers which can produce executables as good as those
>>> written by a skilled Assembler programmer.
>>>      
>> Good points.
>>
>> IIRC, Firebird, once a C based database system (Interbase by Borland), was
>> re-written in C++ by a team of people who simply "liked" C++.  The change
>> happened between version 1.x and 2.x I think.  The upshot is, there was a
>> fork in the project, but the 1.x code lives on.  It seemed to me a lot of
>> effort and I'm not sure what gains they are claiming, because I lost all
>> interest in Firebird when I realized that the project team were about to
>> pour a whole bunch of resources into re-writing it for its own sake, when
>> better returns could have been made on upgrading the existing code.
>>
>> Personally, I like SQLite (and ANS C for that matter) just fine the way
>> they
>> are.  Perhaps Sylvain would prefer to have a look at the Firebird 2.x
>> project
>> for a C++ based DBMS should the implementation language be an issue.
>>
>> Cheers,
>> Rob Sciuk
>> _______________________________________________
>> sqlite-users mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> http://sqlite.org:8080/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/sqlite-users
>>
>>    
> _______________________________________________
> sqlite-users mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://sqlite.org:8080/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/sqlite-users
>  

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